Turkey Carcass

Basic Turkey Stock

Dave DeWitt Cooking with Chiles, Cooking with Chiles at the Holidays Leave a Comment

Here’s what to do with that sad-looking turkey carcass that keeps staring you in the face after you’ve de-fleshed it. You can do the same thing with chicken parts, trimmings, and carcasses. It’s a classic stock from the French school, and may be reduced further to intensify the flavor. It freezes very well. If you’ve been buying bullion in cubes or cans, do yourself a favor, reduce the sodium content, and make this stock from scratch. Breaking the turkey bones releases marrow and adds flavor. It is not hot and spicy in this form, but you can add chile powder or a hot sauce to taste if you wish.

Sambal Oelek (Hot Chile and Lime Condiment)

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This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

 

Indonesian Sambals

by Nancy Gerlach, Fiery-Foods.com Food Editor Emeritus

 

Ingredients

  • 1 cup dried red chiles, such as piquins or cayennes, stems removed

  • 6 cloves garlic

  • 3 tablespoons lime juice, fresh preferred

  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil, peanut preferred

  • Instructions

    Place the chiles in a bowl, cover them with hot water and let them sit for 15 minutes until softened. Remove the chiles, drain and discard the water.

    Combine all the ingredients in a blender or food processor and puree until smooth. Thin the sambal with more lime juice if desired.

    Sambal Oelak (hot chile and lime condiment)

    Dave DeWitt Recipes Leave a Comment

    This basic, hot sambal, which has been called the “mother” of all sambals, is also spelled olek or ulek. Since “olek” means hot peppers, I’ll go with that spelling. This sambal goes well with meats and poultry as well as being a perfect condiment to just add heat to your meal. It can also be used as a base for creating other sambals or as a substitute for fresh chile peppers in recipes.

    Ingredients

    • 1 cup dried red chiles, such as piquins or cayennes, stems removed

    • 6 cloves garlic

    • 3 tablespoons lime juice, fresh preferred

    • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil, peanut preferred

    Instructions

    Place the chiles in a bowl, cover them with hot water and let them sit for 15 minutes until softened. Remove the chiles, drain and discard the water.

    Combine all the ingredients in a blender or food processor and puree until smooth. Thin the sambal with more lime juice if desired.

     

    Sambal Tomat (Tomato Condiment)

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    This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

     

    Indonesian Sambals

    by Nancy Gerlach, Fiery-Foods.com Food Editor Emeritus

     

    Ingredients

    • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil, peanut preferred

    • 10 shallots, chopped

    • 7 cloves garlic, chopped

    • 10 large red chiles, stems and seeds removed, chopped

    • 2 medium tomatoes, cut in wedges

    • 2 teaspoons shrimp paste (trassi)

    • 2 teaspoons lime juice, fresh preferred

    • Salt

    Instructions

    Heat the oil in a heavy skillet over medium high heat. Add the shallots and garlic and saute for 5 minutes, being careful they don’t brown. Add the chiles and saute for another 3 to 5 minutes.

    Add the tomatoes and trassi, reduce the heat, and simmer for 10 minutes.

    Place the tomato mixture along with the lime juice in a blender or food processor. Pulse to a coarse texture. This sambal should not be smooth.

    Season with salt and allow to cool before using.

    Yield: ½ to 1 cup

    Heat Scale: Very Hot