Caribbean Roti with Potato Curry

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‘Rotis are traditional fare throughout the Caribbean and have been called a West Indian version of a burrito. The bread wrapper is East Indian in origin and always contains something curried. ‘

Ingredients

Dough:

  • 4 cups all-purpose flour

  • 2 teaspoons baking powder

  • 1 teaspoon salt

  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil

  • 1 cup water

Filling:

  • 1 tablespoon minced ginger

  • 1 Scotch bonnet or habanero chile, stem and seeds removed, minced

  • 1 to 2 tablespoons vegetable oil

  • 1 small onion, diced

  • 2 cloves garlic, minced

  • 3 tablespoons curry powder

  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme

  • ½ teaspoon ground cloves

  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

  • 3 cups potato, cooked, peeled, and diced

  • 2 tablespoons tamarind paste dissolved in 1/4 cup water (optional)

  • 1 15-ounce can garbanzo beans, drained

  • Vegetable oil for frying

Instructions

To make dough for the rotis: sift the dry ingredients together in a bowl. Gradually stir in the oil and enough water to form a ball. Knead the dough for 5 minutes or until soft. Gather into a ball, cover and let rise for 15 minutes.

To make the filling: sauté the ginger and chile in the oil for a couple of minutes. Add the onions, garlic, spices and the salt and pepper, then sauté until the onions are soft. Add the potatoes, tamarind, garbanzo beans, and 2 cups of water. Simmer for 15 minutes or until very soft but not mushy.

Divide the dough into 4 equal balls. Flatten each and roll out into a circle, 8 to 9 inches in diameter. Heat 2 tablespoons of oil in a skillet until very hot, or until a drop of water will sizzle. Reduce the heat, place the rotis in the pan, and cook for 2 to 3 minutes or until browned. Turn and brown the other side. Remove and cover with a towel until ready to serve.

To serve, place about a cup of the filling in the center of a roti. Fold over the sides and fold up the ends, as you would with a burrito. Serve accompanied with a chutney and/or your favorite hot sauce.

Caribbean Fresh Fruit Compote w/ Habanero Spiked Syrup

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Use this “hot” fruit compote to accent any breakfast or brunch. Since this habanero syrup compliments a wide variety of fruits, vary the ones you use depending on what is in season.

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons cider vinegar

  • 2 tablespoons sugar

  • ½ teaspoon ground habanero chile

  • 1 cup cubed fresh mango

  • 1 cup cubed fresh papaya

  • ½ cup sliced strawberries

  • Garnish: Fresh mint leaves

Instructions

Add the vinegar, sugar, and chile in a small saucepan and stir to mix. Heat the mixture over high until just below the boiling point, reduce the heat, and simmer for 5 minutes. Allow the syrup to cool to room temperature.

Combine the fruit in a large mixing bowl. Pour the sauce over the fruit and toss to coat.

Ladle the fruit into individual bowls, garnish with the mint leaves and serve.

 

Caribbean Chicken Drumsticks

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This recipe is the Caribbean answer to Buffalo wings. Although it calls for the chicken to be grilled, the drumsticks can also be broiled, baked, or even deep-fried before being dipped in the sauce.

Ingredients

Sauce:

  • ½ cup chopped onion

  • 2 tablespoons minced ginger

  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil

  • 1 cup chicken broth

  • ½ cup catsup

  • 1 to 2 habanero chiles, stems and seeds removed, chopped

  • 2 bay leaves

  • 6 allspice berries

  • 5 juniper berries (optional)

  • 1/4 teaspoon ground white pepper

  • 2 pounds chicken wings

Instructions

In a saucepan, saute the onion, ginger, and garlic in the oil until soft. Add the remaining sauce ingredients, bring to a boil, lower the heat, and simmer until the sauce is reduced and thickened. Remove the bay leaves and place the sauce in a blender or food processor and puree until smooth.

 

To form the drumsticks, cut off the wing tips, remove the skin, and cut apart the two bones. Twist and remove the smaller bone. Cut the meat from one half the bone, keeping the meat in one piece. Turn the loosened meat over the attached meat for a mock drumstick.

Brush either the drumsticks or the grill lightly with vegetable oil to keep from sticking to the grill. Cook over a slow fire, turning frequently for 20 to 30 minutes.

To deep fry the drumsticks, heat the oil to 375°F and fry until golden, remove and drain. To bake, place some all-purpose flour in a paper bag, drop in the drumsticks and toss to coat. Shake off any excess flour, and place on a baking pan. Bake in a 350°F oven until done. If you don’’t want to mess with making the drumsticks, just use chicken wings.

 

Caribbean Sun-of-a Beach Hot Pepper Sauce

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This will last up to eight weeks in the refrigerator.

Ingredients

white onion, garlic, cider vinegar, lime or lemon juice, papaya

Instructions

If there were a typical eastern Caribbean hot sauce, this might be it. It has hints of Trinidad, Barbados, and even Grenada. To be perfectly authentic, you should buy or grow the red habaneros so popular in that part of the Caribbean, called Congo or bonney peppers.

  • 1/2 pound red habanero chiles, seeds and stems removed

  • 1 white onion, chopped

  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped

  • 1/2 cup cider vinegar

  • 1/2 cup lime juice (or lemon juice)

  • 2 tablespoons water

  • 1 medium papaya, boiled until tender, peeled, seeded, and finely chopped

  • 1 tomato, finely chopped

  • 1 teaspoon thyme

  • 1 teaspoon basil

  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg

  • 2 tablespoons dry mustard

  • 1/2 teaspoon turmeric

Combine the chiles, onion, garlic, papaya, and tomato in a food processor and puree (you may have to do this in batches). Remove to a shallow bowl.

Combine the vinegar, lime juice, and water in a saucepan and heat until it reaches a slight boil, then sprinkle the thyme, basil, nutmeg, mustard, and turmeric. Pour this hot, spiced mixture over the reserved puree and mix thoroughly. It will last up to eight weeks in the refrigerator.

Yield: 3 to 4 cups

Heat Scale: Hot

Caribbean Sun-of-a Beach Hot Pepper Sauce

Dave DeWitt Recipes Leave a Comment

If there were a typical eastern Caribbean hot sauce, this might be it. It has hints of Trinidad, Barbados, and even Grenada. To be perfectly authentic, you should buy or grow the red habaneros so popular in that part of the Caribbean, called Congo or bonney peppers. This will last up to eight weeks in the refrigerator.

Ingredients

Instructions

Combine the chiles, onion, garlic, papaya, and tomato in a food processor and puree (you may have to do this in batches). Remove to a shallow bowl.

Combine the vinegar, lime juice, and water in a saucepan and heat until it reaches a slight boil, then sprinkle the thyme, basil, nutmeg, mustard, and turmeric. Pour this hot, spiced mixture over the reserved puree and mix thoroughly. It will last up to eight weeks in the refrigerator.